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recoveringsjw:

I am beginning to lose my patience with people who will abandon something they like over one or two things. Like a series over a bad episode. All this stuff is made by multiple people and usually in a really short time frame, chill out.

Are these people who say that no one should like X because one episode was so terrible, or people who just stop watching/reading? Because I’ve read series where one book just ruined it for me. 

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pleatedjeans:

future tumblr user

pleatedjeans:

future tumblr user

(via otterparade)

Tags: kids
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Lessons from reading ten thousand police reports

extremelytrivialpolicereports:

• The vast majority of calls are about nonviolent issues and do not end in an arrest or really anything.

• Surprisingly common crime: scrap metal theft.

• Surprisingly uncommon crime: violence between strangers.  This isn’t an actual statistic, but based on what I’ve seen, I’d say there’s about a hundred domestic violence calls (including quite a lot of parent/child, sibling, and roommate violence; it’s not just romantic partners) for every one attack by a stranger.

• Burglar alarms are useless.  Every police department gets dozens of false-alarm calls a day and I didn’t see one that turned out to be an actual burglar.

• Life-Alert-type systems are not useless.  The scenario of “elderly person falls and can’t get to a phone” is extremely common, and whether they have a Life Alert makes a huge difference in how long it takes them to get help.
• A depressingly large number of people will call in “suspicious person” if they see anyone who looks Middle Eastern (or in some neighborhoods, anyone who isn’t white) just walking around.
• A delightfully large number of people are honest enough to take found cash or jewelry to the police station.
• I’m starting to believe in ghosts.

(via flannelfrog)

Photoset

antiizionism:

yanndere:

tibets:

el-dispute:

Woman Photographs Herself Receiving Strange Looks in Public

“I now reverse the gaze and record their reactions to me while I perform mundane tasks in public spaces. I seek out spaces that are visually interesting and geographically diverse. I try to place myself in compositions that contain feminine icons or advertisements. Otherwise, I position myself and the camera in a pool of people…and wait.

The images capture the gazer in a microsecond moment where they, for unknowable reasons, have a look on their face that questions my presence. Whether they are questioning my position in front of the lens or questioning my body size, the gazer appears to be visually troubled that I am in front of them.”

Photographer: Haley Morris-Cafiero

Project: Wait Watchers 

Source

Thought this was actually really cool and I’d share it with you guys! Takes a lot to get up there and do something like this. Love it!

this is such a fucking important project to me because i am constantly stared at in public in a negative way and turned into some disgusting object for the amusement of others and this is a peaceful way to confront those people

turning the spectators into the spectacle

It’s worth noting that the cameras here were NOT hidden. She set up a decent sized camera on a tripod in random areas, including a crowded sidewalk, and used that to take pictures. Given the situation, of course people were going to look at her. I’m sure most of them were wondering wtf she was doing. I’ve also noticed that in a lot of the pictures, it’s not clear whether people were looking at her. In some of them, people are looking at the camera, and in others people are just looking in her general direction. For example, in the first picture here the only person looking towards her is the woman in the white tunic/dress thing, and she could just as easily have been looking at the sandwich shop.

So I think this is an interesting idea, but the execution could have been a lot better. If she had either a second person helping to take pictures, or some kind of hidden camera, she would have been better able to show what she meant to show. 

(via mortiferamorphasmus)

Tags: art
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minakittaw:

brokenbutbright:

dreamsofamadgirl:

brokenbutbright:

Feminism is like the red pill in the Matrix.

Suddenly you’re watching everyone walk around in this delusion and reality is terrifying.

There’s a reason this exists:

image

(courtesy Sinfest)

HOLY SHIT I HAD NO IDEA THIS GEM EXISTED.

NEITHER DID I!
My feminism got nerdy, and I like it.

I kind of like this, but I can’t see anyone refer to the matrix in the context of gender roles without thinking about that awful subreddit. It’s seriously ruined Matrix analogies for me.

(via nikibee1)

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awesomemodon:

I just contemplated buying a gender-neutral baby romper WITH A T-REX ON IT even though we aren’t even gonna start TRYING for a baby for like, a year because:

1) Gender neutral. 

2) T-rex (Even if it isn’t feathered, I’ll take it)

3) WHAT IF IT’S NOT THERE IN A YEAR!?!?!?!

This is probably just a sign it is 7 in the morning and I’ve let my sleep schedule get really fucked up.

(Read: I will show it to R tomorrow and see what he thinks about pre-buying cool baby clothing.

Don’t judge me.)

Edited to include a link because to a certain portion of my followers this might be a SHUT UP AND TAKE MY MONEY purchase.

You could also wait a bit and see if you can find it used. Most baby clothes aren’t worn for very long, although you do have to watch out for weird stains.

Tags: baby stuff
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recoveringsjw:

sidneyia:

thatsnothowitworks:

paintedparade:

this is it. The Full Acronym.  this includes everybody. every other definition was wrong but this one is Right. Fully Inclusive.  Nobody Left Out.

what is jot

It’s joto/a, a reclaimed homophobic slur in Spanish. (The @ is supposed to be an o and an a combined.) “Xueer” is apparently Spanish also since Spanish doesn’t have the “qu” sound. 
I need to know why “significant other”, “family” and “friends” on here. These are neither genders nor sexual orientations. 
"Hi I’m EJ and I identify as ‘family’." 

I think they go with ally, like I’m part of this group because I’m the so/family/friend of an acronym.
Also I could think of a lot of things they left out if the idea is really getting a “complete” list.

Couple of questions: Why are SO/Family/Friends/Ally all separated out? Shouldn’t they just fall under “Ally”? And if you’re going to include identities from other languages, why only Spanish? 

recoveringsjw:

sidneyia:

thatsnothowitworks:

paintedparade:

this is it. The Full Acronym.  this includes everybody. every other definition was wrong but this one is Right. Fully Inclusive.  Nobody Left Out.

what is jot

It’s joto/a, a reclaimed homophobic slur in Spanish. (The @ is supposed to be an o and an a combined.) “Xueer” is apparently Spanish also since Spanish doesn’t have the “qu” sound. 

I need to know why “significant other”, “family” and “friends” on here. These are neither genders nor sexual orientations. 

"Hi I’m EJ and I identify as ‘family’." 

I think they go with ally, like I’m part of this group because I’m the so/family/friend of an acronym.

Also I could think of a lot of things they left out if the idea is really getting a “complete” list.

Couple of questions: Why are SO/Family/Friends/Ally all separated out? Shouldn’t they just fall under “Ally”? And if you’re going to include identities from other languages, why only Spanish? 

Tags: quiltbag lgbt
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thisandthathistoryblog:

hjuliana:

dancingspirals:

ironychan:

hungrylikethewolfie:

dduane:


A loaf of bread made in the first century AD, which was discovered at Pompeii, preserved for centuries in the volcanic ashes of Mount Vesuvius. The markings visible on the top are made from a Roman bread stamp, which bakeries were required to use in order to mark the source of the loaves, and to prevent fraud. (via Ridiculously Interesting)

(sigh) I’ve seen these before, but this one’s particularly beautiful.

I feel like I’m supposed to be marveling over the fact that this is a loaf of bread that’s been preserved for thousands of years, and don’t get me wrong, that’s hella cool.  But honestly, I’m mostly struck by the unexpected news that “bread fraud” was apparently once a serious concern.

Bread Fraud was a huge thing,  Bread was provided to the Roman people by the government - bakers were given grain to make the free bread, but some of them stole the government grain to use in other baked goods and would add various substitutes, like sawdust or even worse things, to the bread instead.  So if people complained that their free bread was not proper bread, the stamp told them exactly whose bakery they ought to burn down.

Bread stamps continued to be used at least until the Medieval period in Europe. Any commercially sold bread had to be stamped with an official seal to identify the baker to show that it complied with all rules and regulations about size, price, and quality. This way, rotten or undersized loaves could be traced back to the baker. Bakers could be pilloried, sent down the streets in a hurdle cart with the offending loaf tied around their neck, fined, or forbidden to engage in baking commercially ever again in that city. There are records of a baker in London being sent on a hurdle cart because he used an iron rod to increase the weight of his loaves, and another who wrapped rotten dough with fresh who was pilloried. Any baker hurdled three times had to move to a new city if they wanted to continue baking.
If you have made bread, you are probably familiar with a molding board. It’s a flat board used to shape the bread. Clever fraudsters came up with a molding board that had a little hole drilled into it that wasn’t easily noticed. A customer would buy his dough by weight, and then the baker would force some of that dough through the hole, so they could sell and underweight loaf and use the stolen dough to bake new loafs to sell. Molding boards ended up being banned in London after nine different bakers were caught doing this. There were also instances of grain sellers withholding grain to create an artificial scarcity drive up the price of that, and things like bread.
Bread, being one of the main things that literally everyone ate in many parts of the world, ended up with a plethora of rules and regulations. Bakers were probably no more likely to commit fraud than anyone else, but there were so many of them, that we ended up with lots and lots of rules and records of people being shifty.
Check out Fabulous Feasts: Medieval Cookery and Ceremony by Madeleine Pelner Cosman for a whole chapter on food laws as they existed in about 1400. Plus the color plates are fantastic.

ALL OF THIS IS SO COOL

I found something too awesome not share with you! 
I’m completely fascinated by the history of food, could I choose a similar topic for my Third Year Dissertation? Who knows, but it is very interesting all the same!

thisandthathistoryblog:

hjuliana:

dancingspirals:

ironychan:

hungrylikethewolfie:

dduane:

A loaf of bread made in the first century AD, which was discovered at Pompeii, preserved for centuries in the volcanic ashes of Mount Vesuvius. The markings visible on the top are made from a Roman bread stamp, which bakeries were required to use in order to mark the source of the loaves, and to prevent fraud. (via Ridiculously Interesting)

(sigh) I’ve seen these before, but this one’s particularly beautiful.

I feel like I’m supposed to be marveling over the fact that this is a loaf of bread that’s been preserved for thousands of years, and don’t get me wrong, that’s hella cool.  But honestly, I’m mostly struck by the unexpected news that “bread fraud” was apparently once a serious concern.

Bread Fraud was a huge thing,  Bread was provided to the Roman people by the government - bakers were given grain to make the free bread, but some of them stole the government grain to use in other baked goods and would add various substitutes, like sawdust or even worse things, to the bread instead.  So if people complained that their free bread was not proper bread, the stamp told them exactly whose bakery they ought to burn down.

Bread stamps continued to be used at least until the Medieval period in Europe. Any commercially sold bread had to be stamped with an official seal to identify the baker to show that it complied with all rules and regulations about size, price, and quality. This way, rotten or undersized loaves could be traced back to the baker. Bakers could be pilloried, sent down the streets in a hurdle cart with the offending loaf tied around their neck, fined, or forbidden to engage in baking commercially ever again in that city. There are records of a baker in London being sent on a hurdle cart because he used an iron rod to increase the weight of his loaves, and another who wrapped rotten dough with fresh who was pilloried. Any baker hurdled three times had to move to a new city if they wanted to continue baking.

If you have made bread, you are probably familiar with a molding board. It’s a flat board used to shape the bread. Clever fraudsters came up with a molding board that had a little hole drilled into it that wasn’t easily noticed. A customer would buy his dough by weight, and then the baker would force some of that dough through the hole, so they could sell and underweight loaf and use the stolen dough to bake new loafs to sell. Molding boards ended up being banned in London after nine different bakers were caught doing this. There were also instances of grain sellers withholding grain to create an artificial scarcity drive up the price of that, and things like bread.

Bread, being one of the main things that literally everyone ate in many parts of the world, ended up with a plethora of rules and regulations. Bakers were probably no more likely to commit fraud than anyone else, but there were so many of them, that we ended up with lots and lots of rules and records of people being shifty.

Check out Fabulous Feasts: Medieval Cookery and Ceremony by Madeleine Pelner Cosman for a whole chapter on food laws as they existed in about 1400. Plus the color plates are fantastic.

ALL OF THIS IS SO COOL

I found something too awesome not share with you! 

I’m completely fascinated by the history of food, could I choose a similar topic for my Third Year Dissertation? Who knows, but it is very interesting all the same!

(Source: wine-loving-vagabond, via mortiferamorphasmus)

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bitchjerked:

do you ever get mad because there’s so much wasted potential in characters and relationships and plotlines in some shows

(via theangryviolinist)

Link

awesomemodon:

kenobi-wan-obi:

dynastylnoire:

He goes in

I really want this whole thing in transcript or quoted, it’s perfect.

HAHAHA. Is that Dawkins next to Tyson? He looks so uncomfortable at the suggestion that the sciences might be gatekept by white men. Whereas the woman next to Tyson is like “Yup, right on.”

Oh man this segment is beautiful. 

(Source: jessehimself)